Archive for the ‘Willy Lumpkin’ Tag

Fantastic Four #11   2 comments

Fantastic Four #11

Script: Stan Lee

Art: Jack Kirby

Inking: Dick Ayers

Lettering: Art Simek

SYNOPSIS:

The cover of this issue promises to reveal more secrets about the origin of the Fantastic Four. This was a subject of many of the letters the marvel editorial staff received, so Lee and Kirby were sure to include a special segment in this issue, “A Visit With the Fantastic Four.” The story opens with the FF approaching a newsstand, where a line is flowing out the door of people waiting anxiously to get their hand on the new copy of the Fantastic Four comic book.

The FF meet a group of kids who are play acting that they are the Fantastic Four. the real FF give a short demonstration of their powers, making the kids day, before going back to their Baxter Building headquarters. There they meet up with Willy Lumpkin, the old mail-carrier who will be a recurring bit character in the FF for decades.

The FF read the letters of the adoring fans as Ben discovers a package addressed to him. Opening the box, Ben is hit in the face with a boxing glove on a spring. He flies into a rage, blaming the Yancy Street Gang, who are always trying to get a rise out of him. This is another concept that will be brought up over and over again in the coming years: the Yancy Street Gang playing practical jokes on Ben. It’s a fun concept that a lot of different writers will use over the years, most recently mark Waid who had a great, unexpected twist on it (which i won’t spoil here.)

To calm down the Thing, Reed produces yet another serum he hopes will cure Ben of his monstrous form. Reed pours the serum on Ben, who reverts back to normal. The problem doesn’t seem to be changing Ben back to human, the difficult part seems to be making the change last. This particular cure will turn out to be no exception. Not wanting to see Ben get upset when he reverts to Thing form, Johnny takes off.

To pass the time during the cure’s duration, Reed and Ben tell stories of how they met and their time together as college students. It turns out that Reed and Ben were college roommates who, although they were polar opposites with nothing in common, became the very best of friends. Reed cheered louder than anyone at Ben’s football games, and ben beamed with pride as his best friend won science awards. After graduation, both men were in the military, each serving his country with honor.

Reed also brings up that he and Sue were neighbors when they were younger and how he has loved her for years. Sue doesn’t want to talk about this, as she doesn’t know yet if she loves Reed or Namor, the Sub-Mariner. We then get a recounting of the FF’s origin shown in issue 1, and then Sue gets upset because some readers wrote in and claimed she doesn’t do enough and should be kicked off the team. Reed jumps to her defense, telling a story about how Abe Lincoln did everything he did because of his mother, and Sue plays a similar role with the FF, encouraging them and propelling them to success. They also recount how Sue helped them fight off the Skrulls and saved the other three members when they were trapped by Dr. Doom. Ben gets enraged at the letters and once again reverts to his Thing form.

Sue tells ben she should stop wallowing in self-pity and should instead be trying to comfort him, as he is one of the most wonderful people she knows. The alarm goes off, signaling trouble in the flying saucer they kept after their adventure on Planet X. The three enter, only to find Johnny with a birthday cake for Sue. It turns out the three men of the FF have been planning this for days and they celebrate Sue’s birthday as Willy Lumpkin brings in another huge sack of letters.

From there we get to the main story, the introduction of the Impossible Man. Traveling from the planet Poppup in the 10th Dimension, Impossible Man arrives on Earth, where he meets a group of hobos. Impy is starving, but the hobos won’t give away food, he has to buy it. He doesn’t know what cash is, so they tell him to go to a bank and get some. Impy transforms into a rocket ship and blasts off. He finds a bank and changes into a tiny insect, crawling under the vault door. he then steals a bunch of cash, not realizing what he is doing is wrong, and is confronted by the police. They can’t stop him, as Impossible Man transforms into bullet proof steal.

At this point, the FF are called in. They investigate, finding IM at a restaurant, stuffing his face. he explains that his home planet is so dangerous, the population has learned to evolve instantly to survive, so in effect, he can transform into anything he wants with a thought. The Thing naturally loses his tempter and attacks the alien but Impy turns into a thorn covered plant and Thing gets a bunch of thorns stuck in his hand. Johnny tries to attack him, but IM turns into a giant bag of water and douses his flame. no matter what they try, the Impossible Man has a solution. He leaves the restaurant, having had his meal, and his vacation, ruined by the FF.

When he leaves the restaurant, he realizes that human beings can’t change the way he can. He also comes to the conclusion that he is the most powerful being on the planet now. He can whatever he wants! What he wants to do first is drive a car, so he jumps in one and takes off, having a glorious time driving around. The FF find him and he gets mad at them for spoiling his good time. They once again try to stop him, but to no avail. The national guard shows up, but Impossible Man turns into a bomb and they all run away.

The FF try in vain to stop him again, but the Impossible Man has the time of his life fighting them. he hasn’t had this much fun in ages. In fact, he is going to recommend Earth to the tourist division of Poppop! At this point, reed has one of his more brilliant ideas: he just ignores the Impossible Man and shows no interest in anything he does. He instructs everyone else to do the same, and by everyone, I mean EVERYONE. The entire planet Earth just ignores the Impossible Man, no matter what he does. With his wacky hijinks getting no response from anyone, IM soon grows bored and leaves the Earth, vowing never to return and to tell the rest of his planet to also stay away from the boring Earth.

The FF have saved the day by ignoring their opponent. This was such a great solution, I wonder why it hasn’t been tried on anyone else? I would love to see an issue of the Fantastic Four where Dr. Doom proclaims he is going to take over the world and Reed responds with “Go ahead. Who cares?” It would probably be the greatest issue ever of The World’s Greatest Comic Magazine!

COMMENTS:

This issue is a big step in building the relationship between Marvel Comics and its readers. That was part of the appeal of Marvel comics when they first hit the scene. All other comic companies just presented their stories. Marvel Comics attempted to create an atmosphere of fan interaction and even fan participation. Stan Lee always tried to get across the concept that the Marvel creative teams weren’t just these names that produced the issues, they were real people with distinct personalities. They weren’t presented as stuffy professionals just doing a job for a pay check. Lee always tried to make the marvel writers and artists seem like fun-loving people who were trying to make the fans happy. These were almost like your pals, writing and drawing comics just for you.

Marvel always encouraged fans to write in to the comics and made it a point to have jovial, familiar responses to fan letters. this particular issue not only shows a fan on the first page who is thrilled that his letter made the fan page of the FF comic, but it was advertised that the fan letters and post cards actually caused the first part of this comic to be written. The message here is clear: you write and we will listen. Marvel was the comic company for the fans and to an extent, by the fans. This inclusive attitude and embracing of fandom did as much to propel Marvel to the top of the industry as Stan Lee’s more believable, flawed heroes did.

This issue also does a great job of more fully integrating Ben as part of the FF “Family.” Sue and Johnny are siblings, and Reed is Sue’s boyfriend, at least when Namor isn’t around. The three have a strong bond with each other. But before now, Ben was just written as the pilot they hired to fly Reed’s space ship who stays around because he turned into a freak with them. With this issue, he is given a much stronger emotional connection to the other three as it is revealed he and Reed were college roommates and have been best friends for years. Even Sue and Johnny knew him for a long time, as Johnny remarks how he used to cheer for Ben on the football field. Portraying Ben as a close friend of Reed’s for years was a very small detail that made a huge difference in the relationship between the four. They are now not three people with a bond and some guy who was in the wrong place at the wrong time. Instead, the Fantastic Four are truly a quartet and a family.

The main things that happen in this issue are all in the beginning tale. The main feature is a silly story of the Impossible Man. The story is pure wackiness, but it works because we are warned in advance the story is meant to be silly. As a short story that only takes up a few pages, it was a fun chance of pace with a creative ending. It is also a nice breather before next issue, with is the first ever encounter between the Fantastic Four and one of their all-time great adversaries: The Hulk!